Hasenpfeffer … Paired with Adelsheim

Pairing: Hasenpfeffer (Rabbit) Paired with a 2012 Adelsheim Pinot Noir

Food:  “Hase” is the German word for “hare”. So, to make this recipe authentically, one might use a snowshoe hare or perhaps a jackrabbit. For those of us who don’t hunt or have access to such wild game, domestic rabbit is quite available at a local butcher shop. Recipes for Hasenpfeffer, and there are a gazillion of them, date back to the 13th century or older in the Westphalia area of Germany. Most all recipes call for a long marinating time (a few days) in some combination of red wine, vinegar, and various spices and herbs, always including black pepper (the English translation of the German word “pfeffer”). We use the recipe from the Luchow’s German Festival Cookbook. The beauty of this recipe is that it does not call for a long marinate. The rabbit pieces are stewed in liquid made with port wine, beef stock, lemon juice, onion, cloves, and peppercorns. We then take the meat off the bones, reduce and thicken the liquid. Then serve it over noodles. It can also be ladled over potatoes or, more traditionally, dumplings. Dig in!

Hassenpheffer with Pinot NoirJPG

Wine:  The Willamette Valley in Oregon produces world-class Pinot Noir, comparing favorably with the wines from Burgundy, California and New Zealand. The Adelsheim winery is located in the Chehalem Mountains in the north Willamette Valley, and the family planted their first vineyards in these mountains in 1972. Pinot Noir pairs beautifully with so many foods … roast chicken, duck, beef, lamb, mushrooms, salmon, tuna … the list goes on and on. Overlooked sometimes is its compatibility with several game animals … quail, wild turkey, venison, squirrel, pheasant … and … here we are drinking it with a well-known rabbit dish … Hasenpfeffer. Delightful!

Adelsheim Pinot Noir

Tasting Notes:  A deep garnet color. The aroma of ripe black cherries combined with the rich woodland smells one experiences while hiking through a forest. On the palate you get cherry again … maybe even cherry cola (a very pleasant taste one sometimes gets with Pinot Noir). One also gets a nice balanced acidity in the wine similar to a Burgundy wine. The light tannins in the wine bring out the pepper in the Hasenpfeffer. Very nice.

Other Wines That Pair Well with Hasenpfeffer: Riesling (Germany). Barolo (Italy), Rioja (Spain), Merlot (Italy), Côte-Rôtie (France)

Other Game That Pairs Well with Pinot Noir:  Quail, Pheasant, Venison, Wild Turkey

View Oregon’s Beautiful Willamette Valley:  Willamette Valley

A Source:  www.wine.com

 

 

 

 

 

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Pear and Blue Cheese Salad … Perfect Paired with German Riesling

Pairing: Pear, Blue Cheese, and Walnut Salad Paired with a 2014 Selbach Oster Zeltinger Sonnenuhr Kabinett Riesling

Food:  Comice Pears are starting to appear again in the food markets in New Hampshire, a bit earlier than normal. They are, without any doubt, our very favorite pears … sweet and juicy! Their actual name is Doyenné du Comice and the variety originated in Angiers, France in the mid-19th Century. They are unparalleled in a salad of mixed greens, creamy blue cheese and walnuts, all dressed with a vinaigrette of olive oil and balsamic vinegar. An amazing flavor combination!

Pear and Blue Cheese Salad

Wine:  The precariously steep, slate-covered slopes of the Zeltinger Sonnenuhr are recognized as among the most prestigious wine growing sites of the Mosel River region of Germany. And the Selbach family have been making wine in this region since the mid-1600’s. But the first vineyards in this area were planted in the 2nd Century by the Romans. The unique terroir of this region combined with the vast experience of the winemakers, passed down through many generations, results in impeccable wines. This Kabinett, made from early harvested grapes, is no exception.

Selbach Oster Riesling

Tasting Notes:  Color is pale yellow with a decidedly greenish tinge. Cut open a ripe honeydew melon, put your nose down close and inhale deeply. That’s it! That’s the nose of this superb wine. Although pure and clean and fresh are not usually descriptors of flavors, they are words that immediately come to mind when tasting this riesling. Now visualize a crystal clear mountain stream rippling over some rocks … take a sip … add some gentle sweetness … aaah … perfection. A truly stunning riesling … and pairs beautifully with every element of the salad, including the balsamic vinegar in the dressing. An exemplary riesling in every way.

Other Wines That Pair Well with Pear and Blue Cheese Salad:  Champagne (France), Chardonnay (California), Chenin Blanc (South Africa), Gewürztraminer (Alsace)

Other Food That Pairs Well with a German Riesling:  Apple Dishes, Asian Cuisine, Trout, Shellfish, Hazelnuts

A Great Read on German and Austrian Wines:  http://www.vinography.com/archives/2010/09/book_review_reading_between_th.html

A Source:  www.wine.com