Burgundian Ham Flan … Lovely with a Pinot Noir from Tasmania

Pairing: A Burgundian Ham Flan Paired with a 2013 Spring Vale Pinot Noir from the Freycinet Coast, Tasmania

Food: Our recipe for Burgundian Ham Flan comes Anne Willan’s first book on French Regional Cooking. Although we have a number of cookbooks on French cooking, this was our first and remains our favorite. For two people, the recipe calls for 2 and 1/2 oz of ham (diced), 1/2 oz prosciutto, 4 eggs, 1 cup of milk, 2 T flour, a pinch or 2 of ground allspice, 1 tsp fresh thyme, salt and pepper to taste. Brush lightly with olive oil an 8 inch baking dish. Distribute the ham over the bottom of the dish. Add the allspice to the milk, and bring it slowly to a boil. Whisk the eggs with the flour until it is smooth. Take the milk off the heat. While you whisk, add the egg/flour to the milk, then stir in the thyme, salt, and pepper. Pour over the ham in the baking dish and place some parsley leaves on the surface of the eggs. Bake at 350F for 25 minutes, until the eggs are set and golden brown. Serve cool or at room temperature along with a simple green salad. Delicious!

Wine: So, let’s be honest, when was the first time you heard the word “Tasmania”? I was six or seven years, old watching a Loony Tunes cartoon on TV. Racing across the screen, chasing our intrepid hero Bugs Bunny was a whirling dervish called … the Tasmanian Devil. Some years later I learned this was a real animal (a marsupial) from a real place … Tasmania. Located 150 miles off the southeast coast of Australia, the island has been gaining well-deserved accolades for its wines. Particularly noteworthy is their Chardonnay and Pinot Noir, both still wines and sparkling wines. The Freycinet Coast is not only an ideal locale for vineyards (like the Spring Vale winery), but is also breathtakingly beautiful.

Note: Yes, the classic pairing for this Burgundian dish would be a red burgundy or white burgundy wine. But, as readers of this blog have come to know, Peter’s Picks is all about expanding possibilities when pairing food and wine.

Tasting Notes: Color is dark purple with a very light brownish orange tint. Repeated sniffs of the wine reveals a bouquet of raspberry, blueberry, wild cherry, and black plum. Amazingly, the wine combines the taste of both fresh fruits and fruit jam of the same fruits that describe the bouquet. You could sip this wine all evening … enjoyable with or without the food, but … Pinot Noir and ham is a classic pairing you don’t want to miss.

Other Wines That Pair Well with Ham Flan: Sancerre (Loire Valley, France), Beaujolais (France), Chardonnay (Oregon), Pinot Blanc (Alsace)

Other Food That Pairs Well with Pinot Noir:  White Fish in a Cream and Mushroom Sauce, Pan-Seared Salmon, Prosciutto, Quiche Lorraine

Views of the Tasmania Wine Region:  Tasmania Vineyards

A Source:  www.wine.com

Egg Fu Yung (with Shrimp) … A Delicious Pairing with a California Viognier

Pairing: Egg Fu Yung (with Shrimp) Paired with a 2017 “Wild Thing” Viognier (Damiano Vineyard, Placer County)

Food:  Egg Fu Yung (Egg Foo Young) is a popular, ridiculously easy, Asian omelette made with ingredients one often uses in a basic stir fry. This version combines chopped celery, mushrooms, bean sprouts, scallion, ground fresh ginger, and small, chopped shrimp. Gently beat some eggs (two per person) and set aside. Put a little peanut oil in a hot wok or pan. Quickly stir fry the vegetables, aromatics and shrimp. Then, gently pour in the lightly beaten eggs. Without stirring, cook until lightly browned and carefully turn over long enough so that both sides are golden brown. Serve with some wilted spinach and topped with a light sauce composed of oyster sauce, fish sauce, and soy sauce. Interestingly enough, some people enjoy putting brown gravy on it instead.

Shrimp Fu Yung

Wine:  We most often associate Viognier with the “South of France,” the area that encompasses the extensive Languedoc-Roussillon wine region. There, Viognier is frequently blended with Roussanne and Marsanne in the making of an excellent and versatile white wine. The standard for single varietal Viognier is undoubtably Condrieu from the northern Rhone region.

With that background, let’s travel 6,000 miles west to California. Placer County is located in the heart of the Sierra Foothills wine region, one of the largest wine regions area-wise in the entire United States at 2.6 million acres. The dry, rocky, mostly infertile soils there force the roots of the grape vines to dig deep to find water and nutrients. This, in turn, produces wines of great intensity. Viognier, once near extinction with only 35 acres worldwide, today thrives in these conditions as it does in the northern Rhone Valley in southern France and now elsewhere throughout the world.

Viognier Wild Thing

Tasting Notes: The color of 14 carat gold. A complex nose of mixed tropical fruits and white flowers (notably mock orange). On the palate, one can detect mango, pineapple, and white peach. An enchanting wine by itself, and a beautiful complement to the Egg Fu Yung.

Other Wines That Pair Well with Egg Fu Yung (with Shrimp): Pinot Grigio (Italy), Verdelho (Portugal), White Burgundy (France), Riesling (Alsace)

Other Food That Pairs Well with Viognier:  Curries, White Fish, Scallops, Crab, Lobster, Dishes with Cream or Butter Sauces

View the Sierra Foothills Wine Region:  Sierra Foothills

A Source:  www. klwines.com

A French Country Omelette … Outstanding Paired with a Pouilly-Fuisse

Pairing: Bacon, Potato and Goat Cheese Omelette Paired with a 2015 Chàteau-Fuissé Pouilly-Fuissé Tête de Cru

Food:  An omelette is the ultimate fast food … and it’s not just for breakfast. A dinner omelette is a perfect meal … optionally fancy or rustic, inexpensive (unless you are incorporating thin slices of black truffles!), and can be made in a matter of minutes. And you can make it with almost anything … well, one does need eggs. But, most any cheese, meat (terrestrial or aquatic), vegetable, mushroom, herb … the sky’s the limit. The one created here is made with some leftover fingerling potatoes, a little cooked bacon, and topped with a smear of soft goat cheese. A bit of salad on the side completes the meal. And, of course, a glass of wine.

Bacon & Goat Cheese Omelette

Wine: The Maconnais wine district is located in the southern part of the historic and highly regarded Burgundy wine region in eastern France. As one travels through Burgundy, one passes through row after row, mile after mile of vineyards stretching out before you in all directions. The scene is different in the Maconnais district. Here one sees vineyards interspersed with diverse croplands and animal pastures … much more like farmland and the more typical French countryside. Puilly-Fuisse is the premiere appellation in the Maconnais producing the very finest white wines in this district. Like all AOC designated white wines produced throughout the Burgundy region, Puilly-Fuissé is made from 100% Chardonnay.

Pouilly-Fuisse

Tasting Notes:  A beautiful gold color. A fragrant bouquet featuring melon, mango, and peach. On the palate a delicate sweetness is quietly present in this lovely dry Chardonnay. Caramel/ toffee along with ripe sweet peach, apricot and cantaloupe flavors. A delightful wine that really complements the omelette, particularly with the bacon and goat cheese elements.

Other Wines That Pair Well with Bacon, Potato and Goat Cheese Omelette: Sancerre (Loire Valley, France), White Bordeaux (France), Chardonnay (Umbria, Italy), Sauvignon Blanc (California)

Other Food That Pairs Well with Pouilly-Fuisse:  White Fish in a Cream Sauce, Pan-Seared Salmon, Prosciutto, Quiche Lorraine

Maps and Views of the Pouilly-Fuisse Wine Region:  Pouilly-Fuisse Wine Region

A Source:  www.wine.com